1. Trey

    Trey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    12
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2019
    Location:
    Southern MO
    One thing on our new Cordoba that doesn't work are the horn buttons and my car won't pass inspection without a horn. I have looked the last couple days and haven't had any luck locating any. I would assume these aren't reproduced but does anyone have a good set or is there another steering wheel from another Mopar that will work and look close to stock? Aftermarket wheels would be my last choice as I want to keep the car as original as possible. The wheel looks like this if it's any help. Thanks for any help. s-l1600.jpg
     
  2. barbee6043

    barbee6043 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    35
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    s e texas
    I just mount a button switch under the dash for the horn. Check and see if it is making good contact, could need cleaning, and if the horns actually got power. He work by the switch making a ground.
     
  3. Trey

    Trey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    12
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2019
    Location:
    Southern MO
    Thanks for the reply. The problem is the horn blows all the time because the buttons have what looks like a piece of foam to separate the contacts and it has deteriorated over the years. The previous owner just removed the fuse to kill the horns. I may end up with a button like you suggest until I can repair/replace these. The steering wheel is almost perfect so I'd like to keep it. thanks again.
     
  4. barbee6043

    barbee6043 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    35
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    s e texas
    Place a wanted ad here or on some of the numerous F body sites in Facebook. Parts are out there!
     
  5. old yellow 78

    old yellow 78 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,089
    Likes Received:
    317
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2015
    Location:
    near Allentown, PA
    I had success by using double sided adhesive foam tape insulation to replace the original deteriorated foam. It was a bit more firm than the original, but it worked. It is sold in hardware stores where you get insulation for doors and windows.
     
  6. 89.Fifth

    89.Fifth Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    81
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Location:
    New York, NY
    So you just need replacement foam? That shouldn't be too tough.
     
  7. Trey

    Trey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    12
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2019
    Location:
    Southern MO
    Thanks for the suggestions.Thought I'd post up my fix and maybe it would help someone else.
    Here's what I started with. There's no space between the contacts: horn1.gif

    I took it apart to examine. As I thought, the foam was toast: horn2.gif

    I removed the backing of the foam from the contacts: horn3.gif
    Cleaned the adhesive from the contacts with lacquer thinner. The clean one is silver: horn4.gif
    I couldn't find foam weatherstrip that was thin enough but I found two sided tape I thought would work. Some folks call it carpet tape. Comparison pic to the thinnest foam insulation (1/8") I could find and the carpet tape: horn5.gif
    Here's how I attached the carpet tape. I couldn't make the little holes like the factory piece but felt I could get close: horn6.gif
    And here it is back together, notice there's clearance between the contacts now. Sorry about the blurry pic. I repaired the other half the same way and put it in the car and it works like a charm. It took less time to do this than what I spent hunting new switches: horn7.gif
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
    barbee6043 likes this.
  8. 89.Fifth

    89.Fifth Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    81
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Well done!
     
  9. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,654
    Likes Received:
    977
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    I have repaired a number of those “foam style” switches before – especially when either parts were not available or at end of day Friday, etc. to get customer back on the road again. The thick double stick tape works best – if thick enough (might have to double up). I have also used felt (doubled up).
    When using felt, I’ve used the thin double-sided tape. The double-sided tape is not great-but does hold things together long enough to get the holes punched and thing but back together with. I then used a leather punch or a paper punch to make the holes with.

    Leather Punch a.jpg
    This style with a sharp punch and a piece of wood/sturdy plastic works best (if available).

    Hole Punch a.jpg

    Leather Punch b.jpg
    These styles also work – but you might have to make multiple holes, per hole.

    Note: I’ve even seen new switches that the foam is already deteriorating/falling apart – so even if you can find a NOS switch – means no guarantee that it will not be in same condition as your existing switch.

    Just whatever material you use does need to have "give" to it, is not a conductor of electricity and keeps the two electrical contacts close but away from each other. When I mean close, I mean a person must push to make electrical contact. You don’t want to run over a pothole and have your horn go off.

    With that, the sky might be your limit as to what materials to use.

    The only thing I don't have is pictures of past work.
    BudW
     
  10. old yellow 78

    old yellow 78 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,089
    Likes Received:
    317
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2015
    Location:
    near Allentown, PA
    I'm going to be putting the three spoke wheel that I got from member "silverd1973" on OY soon, now that I am finally getting to work on the interior. It has a few cracks, but is one of the best that I have seen - actually one of the very few that I have seen! I will probably have to do this to make the horns work - or maybe stop working :D
    IMG_3208.JPG
     
  11. Ele115

    Ele115 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    41
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2019
    Location:
    Tampa FL
    Eastwood has the materials to repair those types of steering wheels. I used it on a 49 Cadillac and it held up well
     
  12. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,654
    Likes Received:
    977
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    The horn switches on that steering wheel is two strips of metal the length of the three arms (3½ inch long? each) with a piece of foam between the metal strips. The foam collapses to allow the metal contacts to make the circuit. In this case, that foam deteriorates over time and allows the two strips to make contact on their own (which is not good). It is not a hard fix but cumbersome sense all three strips are held together with wires that are joined in the middle.

    "If memory is correct, looks like this"
    Horn Switch.png

    The part number for the switch is P147MX9. It has been discontinued by Chrysler for a while, but it appears a few might still be out there. Retail price (if found) is $54.50 (US).
    P147MX9.png
    (three switches and three covers)

    The part number for the spoke cover (vinyl?) is 4019457, which was only recently discontinued by Chrysler. If a dealer has one, the retail price is $13.50 (US).

    Mopar NOS 1976-79 Plymouth Dodge Chrysler 3 Spoke Wheel Horn Switch ALL P147MX9 | eBay

    Set of (3) Mopar Dodge Horn Buttons Button Pads Part No. 4019457 OEM 26577 | eBay This one is marked as a spoke cover, but it is for a switch and three spoke covers (mismarked). This one is not bad price wise, so I might recommend getting it, rebuilding it and your existing switch, and placing the spare switch in a vacuum food bag (to prevent air damaging the foam). The spare should last forever without air touching it.

    Also, be sure to clean the metal contacts before assembly.
    BudW