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Just a quick question

Interior and Electrical

  1. Jnfbodyguy83

    Jnfbodyguy83 Well-Known Member

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    Tonwanda, ny
    Hey guys!
    I'm trying to do some research for my uncle on his 85 ram. We're thinking the wire on the positive cable with the quick disconnect is a fusiable link, but it also runs to the battery. His was cooked on the truck. Is there a replacement one or is there a way to update that wire. I know this will be an interesting one to decifer.
    Let me know, thanks in advance
    Cam W.

    IMG_20171114_154404.jpg
     
  2. AJ/FormS

    AJ/FormS Well-Known Member

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    Open it up; it's just a QD; quick Disconnect.OOps,You already said that,lol.
    OK so follow it along to the other end. Notice that it is a thinner gauge wire than what is at the two ends. That makes it a fusible link. It protects the main wire by sacrificing itself in the event of an overload.
    But, It doesn't blow like a fuse. A fuse responds to an overload instantly. Whereas a F-link can run hot for quite some time before expiring. And it can survive multiple events.
    F-links are color coded. If your original wire is completely gone you will have to refer to the wiring diagram to see what color the replacement needs to be. While you can put anything in there that you care to, the only proper repair (if you value the truck) is by replacement with the correct color part.You can get plug-in links at the dealer, splice-ins at jobbers. Soldering these is NOT a reliable repair.Plug-in is best.
    Of course you need to figure out what caused the failure and fix that first. Isolate the circuit to find the hi-current draws on the line and start checking them one-by-one. If no fuses down the line are blown, then you'll have to start looking at various connections. And it may even be that someone has already replaced the offending device, and just never bothered to properly repair the F-link.
    BUT
    The only time I have seen that large a cable with a QD on it, it was supplying multiple F-links. Like three of more.
    And sometimes there's no fusible link at all following, it may just be a splitter on a high-current line like the alternator output.
    I have a feeling that QD should have two cables coming out of it, both headed for the #1 splice; a fat red one and a fat black one. From that #1splice , power is routed everywhere including another pair of fat wires to the alternator. At the #1 splice,there may be as many as 10 or more wires all connected together.They call it a weld. Some of the other places those wires go to are; ignition switch, fuse-box,computer, A/C system,or to other splices.Some of those may have their own F-links.

    I guess the bottom line is,you need a wiring diagram.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
  3. Jnfbodyguy83

    Jnfbodyguy83 Well-Known Member

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    I figured it was some sort of fusible link. I noticed on the doba it runs straight to the ignition module on the firewall to the battery port. The truck I'm not entirely sure how that is set up, im guessing it's kind of the same way. Thanks again for the info, I'll relay the message to my uncle.
     
  4. AJ/FormS

    AJ/FormS Well-Known Member

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    A have never seen a fusible link using copper wires. All the ones I have ever seen,the wires looked steel colored and regular solder does not stick to them very well. Also factory links usually have a flag molded onto them, the same color as the insulation, be it red,yellow,blue,etc.
    I have temporarily replaced burned off links with standard copper wires one or two gauges smaller than the wires in the circuit.I install them with tight-fitting butt connectors, and double crimp each end, and of course,seal them with shrink-tube.
    If you feel a link,any link, get hot,something is wrong.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017