FOR SALE 88 Diplomat AHB Sway Bars

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88_AHB

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Have a set of sway bars off of a 88 Dodge Diplomat AHB car. I might have a set of the spring/shock plates in the garage will have to check. Will ship at buyers expense, located in zip 94928 CA. Looking for $150 for the pair. Message me if interested. Thanks

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Logan

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I'm Interested,
I've been looking for rear sway bar pieces for a while now for my 78 LeBaron Town&Country. I have the bar but the spring plates and frame mounting hardware have eluded me for quite some time. Please let me know if you have those plates and would be willing to sell me the hardware minus the bars.
Thanks,
Logan
 

88_AHB

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I'll let you know, but unless someone just wanted the bars. I'd prefer to sell them altogether since most people want everything for the swap. I think firm feel sells the plates new but, for the iso delete setup which most people do anyways.
 

Logan

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I’m willing to buy the whole setup if you have the spring plates, I just figured someone out there could use the bars and I could save on pricey shipping of parts that I hope to never need.
Either way I’ll be happy to get a sway bar on my wagon.
Have a good weekend,
Logan
 

kmccabe56

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Has anybody put a rear sway bar on a wagon? I'm REALLY curious to know. I'm fortunate enough to know a now retired Chrysler engineer who was part of the development team for Fbody, particularly suspension. I had talked to him years ago about putting the front bar in polyurethane and adding the cop-car rear bar. He cautioned against the rear bar. Why? Because there is more mass (weight) behind the rear axle on a wagon than there is on the cop-car sedan. His concern was snap oversteer.

So again, I ask, has anybody actually put a rear sway bar on a wagon?????
 

88_AHB

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I’m willing to buy the whole setup if you have the spring plates, I just figured someone out there could use the bars and I could save on pricey shipping of parts that I hope to never need.
Either way I’ll be happy to get a sway bar on my wagon.
Have a good weekend,
Logan
I was not able to find the spring plates, unfortunately. The bars did sell to a member and shipped them today. Thanks
 

Mr Volare Imperial

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Has anybody put a rear sway bar on a wagon? I'm REALLY curious to know. I'm fortunate enough to know a now retired Chrysler engineer who was part of the development team for Fbody, particularly suspension. I had talked to him years ago about putting the front bar in polyurethane and adding the cop-car rear bar. He cautioned against the rear bar. Why? Because there is more mass (weight) behind the rear axle on a wagon than there is on the cop-car sedan. His concern was snap oversteer.

So again, I ask, has anybody actually put a rear sway bar on a wagon?????
That is a chunk of mopar gold! Did he mention how the Hotchkiss leaf spring shackles/hangers provide a small amount of rear steering? I suspect that would have been part of his calculous for 'snap oversteer". If you read thru the September, 1965 Master Technician Service Conference "Roadability and Handling" lesson, the Rear Suspension And Rear Axle Geometry section explain how this works. Roadability and Handling (Session 214) from the Master Technician's Service Conference
Page 5 explains the reason the leaf spring pack sits relatively flat, this is to improve stiffness, deflecting rear end sway and improving the effectiveness of jounce induced rear steering.
Page 6, Roadability and Handling (Session 214) from the Master Technician's Service Conference
explains first how the rear wheels move forward as the rear enters "jounce", ie when the axle move upward over a bump. The movement follows an arc produced by the leaf spring hangers.
Next, "Understeer On Turns" explains how this applies to highway speed cornering. With the same principle, while entering a corner, the outside rear wheel will set into a 'jounce" positioning, pulling the outside wheel forward and giving a caster effect to the steering as a whole. As the front wheels are turned, the rear wheels follow in a similar manner. This is what lets us setup for a corner and mash the gas to power out of it. If the rear wheels didn't pivot, they'd want to plow straight ahead increasing the chance for oversteer.
The engineer's point of snap oversteer is one I've pondered while considering rear sway bars in the past, particularly on my Volare wagon. A sway bar controls how much the body rolls in relation to the axle. Reducing that roll reduces the rear steering effect on this Hotchkiss axle design.

I have found KYB GasAdjust shocks do a great job at taming the live axle beast while not reducing the effectiveness of this rear steering ability. Happy reading!
 

kmccabe56

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That is a chunk of mopar gold! Did he mention how the Hotchkiss leaf spring shackles/hangers provide a small amount of rear steering? I suspect that would have been part of his calculous for 'snap oversteer". If you read thru the September, 1965 Master Technician Service Conference "Roadability and Handling" lesson, the Rear Suspension And Rear Axle Geometry section explain how this works. Roadability and Handling (Session 214) from the Master Technician's Service Conference
Page 5 explains the reason the leaf spring pack sits relatively flat, this is to improve stiffness, deflecting rear end sway and improving the effectiveness of jounce induced rear steering.
Page 6, Roadability and Handling (Session 214) from the Master Technician's Service Conference
explains first how the rear wheels move forward as the rear enters "jounce", ie when the axle move upward over a bump. The movement follows an arc produced by the leaf spring hangers.
Next, "Understeer On Turns" explains how this applies to highway speed cornering. With the same principle, while entering a corner, the outside rear wheel will set into a 'jounce" positioning, pulling the outside wheel forward and giving a caster effect to the steering as a whole. As the front wheels are turned, the rear wheels follow in a similar manner. This is what lets us setup for a corner and mash the gas to power out of it. If the rear wheels didn't pivot, they'd want to plow straight ahead increasing the chance for oversteer.
The engineer's point of snap oversteer is one I've pondered while considering rear sway bars in the past, particularly on my Volare wagon. A sway bar controls how much the body rolls in relation to the axle. Reducing that roll reduces the rear steering effect on this Hotchkiss axle design.

I have found KYB GasAdjust shocks do a great job at taming the live axle beast while not reducing the effectiveness of this rear steering ability. Happy reading!
Thanks for this. I had the basic theory of rear wheel steer explained to me decades ago by a friend who at the time was Chrysler's Chief Chassis and Suspension engineer. So, in the case of a rear sway bar on an F/M/J/Y body car, it's going to reduce the understeer considerably. Add in the extra mass behind the rear wheels, and I now see how great the potential is for snap oversteer.

I put KYBs on my car as soon as I could order them and get them installed. Putting the front ones in requires a contortionist, but the rears are simple.

These few pages should be required reading for every car owner who thinks the answer to putting bigger tires on the back of their car is to increase the ride height.
 

XfbodyX

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Edit: Sorry, I did not see this was in the for sale section.
 
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LSM360

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Has anybody put a rear sway bar on a wagon? I'm REALLY curious to know. I'm fortunate enough to know a now retired Chrysler engineer who was part of the development team for Fbody, particularly suspension. I had talked to him years ago about putting the front bar in polyurethane and adding the cop-car rear bar. He cautioned against the rear bar. Why? Because there is more mass (weight) behind the rear axle on a wagon than there is on the cop-car sedan. His concern was snap oversteer.

So again, I ask, has anybody actually put a rear sway bar on a wagon?????
You are VERY fortunate! I'd love to know a former Chrysler engineer! Maybe a moderator can move partial thread, I don't know. Thanks for sharing just the same!
 
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