'82 Imperial basic questions from a new owner

J Body General Discussion

  1. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    This car has not been registered since 1999, and no sign of an inspection sticker, so I am guessing it has been sitting for at least a decade.

    I can see that the Fuel Injection has been removed and placed in the trunk.

    Holley 4bbl, and Weiand Stealth intake manifold are on the motor w/ a Carter electric fuel pump over the top of the right hand valve cover...(seems like a poor choice of location to me)

    Questions: Where do I find basic service information, will a Motor manual cover the Imperial? OR do I need to find a Factory Service Manual?

    Can I put a mechanical fuel pump on it, as I do not really trust the Carter to hold up long term.. especially in the high heat, and long distance from the fuel tank?

    It has 215-75-15's I believe, That are complete junk. What tire sizes do you all use when looking for a bit more rubber on the ground?

    In General does anything that works for the F & M body work for the J body? OR are the electronics different? Any other useful info Is welcome, I want to get up to speed on this thing.. Will need to do some gasket work around the front and rear windshields.. and maybe side windows, as the interior and trunk are musty! then it is time for a big cleaning, and some cruising.
    Thanks,
    J
     
  2. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    The FSM (Factory Service Manual) is BY FAR the best information you can get for repair and diagnostic information. IMO, the published Haynes, Chilton’s and Motors books can be helpful and far-from-helpful as you can get, sometimes.

    A quick search on eBay, I came up with this: 1982 Chrysler Dodge Plymouth RWD Service Shop Repair Manual Set of 2 82 OEM | eBay
    There might be more options on eBay or other locations. The FSM should come in two volumes, electrical and everything else. Total combined thickness should be about an inch thick.

    Chrysler made other FSM’s in ’82, as well, so be sure Imperial is printed on the outer cover, before buying.
    Other versions are: Front Wheel Drive, Colt (imports), pickup and van.

    You can install a 318/360 mechanical fuel pump on engine, but that will (or should) require the engine timing cover to be removed to install the fuel pump eccentric onto the camshaft gear.
    Actually, I should backup a moment. Many Imperials were converted from fuel injection to carburetor, back in the ‘80’s. If so, then the instrument cluster should work properly (with a carburetor – depending on what was “altered” for Holley install) and the fuel pump eccentric is already in place.

    One of the items for the instrument cluster to work, is a fuel flow sensor installed around the intake or valve cover area – that sensor, at first glance, looks like a fuel pump. You might want to take a few underhood pictures and post them here, so we can tell what will work and what we recommend changing.

    Much of the chassis (unibody), suspension and so forth is the same as F, M and other J’s. The differences are the outer sheet metal parts and some of the electrical, over other J’s or FM 2-door cars. Parts are more common than different between FMJ’s except for a few details. If you have a question about interchangeability, start a new thread and someone here can answer.
    BudW
     
  3. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    Ok Thanks Bud. I've bookmarked the FSM you have supplied. Most likely will purchase it.

    I am going to guess that the carb conversion was more recent, as it has a carter electronic fuel pump pumping through a NAPA branded fuel regulator.... Nothing wrong with that all in general, but it is pulling fuel rather than pushing, so it may not live very long (also there was a box of throttle body parts in the trunk are they worth anything to someone else? Also the 2bbl intake manifold is on the scrap heap, but if someone wants it, holler!).

    That triggers a question: do the carb conversions suffer from fuel percolation after shut down(due to quality of fuel in today's world)? If that is an issue, maybe it is worth putting the fuel pump back by the fuel tank?

    I will take a photo or two and post here.. There is a lot going on in the engine room, and my I want to learn my way around.
     
  4. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    My experience is to use (if possible) 100% gasoline.
    Even the computer-controlled carburetors used in the ‘80’s can’t accommodate E10 fuel very well. Todays aftermarket fuel injection systems can work well with today’s fuel (but not these).

    If car is using a 3-prong fuel filter or has a provision for excess fuel to return to fuel tank, then (in most cases) fuel percolation (vapor lock) shouldn’t be an issue. Again, underhood pictures will help with that.
    Fi pg3499.jpg


    This can still be a problem. My ’86 Fifth Ave can evaporate the fuel out of the carburetor overnight, after a long (and hard) city drive. Once engine has been cranking for a few seconds, it will start right up. It is just a pain that it doesn’t start at first crank.

    The factory fuel injection has a in-tank fuel pump. I suspect someone might have bypassed that pump somehow(maybe).

    As far as location of fuel pump. Back by the fuel tank or under the tank is by far the best location. Up front of car but down low is OK but not preferred. Up high on engine – I can’t see being recommended.


    The intake manifold has an odd bolt pattern to it. It is the same intake used for ‘87-91 pickup/van/Dakota fuel injection – so if a person really wanted one, they are still out there to be found. Otherwise, boat anchor, door stop, etc. are good options. The other fuel injection parts are sellable items – for someone still using the factory setup. I wouldn’t expect a lot of money for parts, though.
    TBI Gasket.png
    BudW
     
  5. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    I've just learned about the fuel filters with a return port. That may be useful. I was thinking there was a return line to the fuel tank. When I was rigging up a temporary fuel cell to drive the car home, I noticed what looked like a fuel line that had a bolt stuffed in it, right next to the fuel line.

    The fuel filters (there are 2 in parallel below the passenger door hinge) may or may not have the vapor return port,I will find out tomorrow. The fuel tank has who knows how old gasoline in it. I have jacked up the rear, and intend to drain the tank via the fuel line at those filters.

    Below is my first attempt at attaching a photo of what I am calling the fuel pump and pressure regulator.

    IMG_0299.JPG
     
  6. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    I am willing to donate the fuel injection parts, IF someone wants them, but at present they are on the scrap heap, and I am assuming it was removed because it was not working as desired..
     
  7. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    100% non ethanol fuel helps for reducing percolation. The biggest problem for carbureted vehicles is the gasoline has a lower vapor pressure and will evaporate/percolate a lot easier than it did 30 years ago. It's formulated for EFI, which is higher pressure, so percolation and "vapor lock" isn't a concern and the fuel is formulated accordingly. It's not poor quality fuel, it's just fuel made for 95% of the vehicles on the road, which have fuel injection.
     
  8. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    Good point, and good information. It seems to me that the ideal solution would be to put a fuel pump back by the tank, and then the carb fuel bowl is refilled when the key is turned on.. allowing 87 Octane. I have NO issue with running non ethanol fuel, but the only stuff sold around here is Super Unleaded, and if I am spending the extra coin to get good fuel I want a motor that has enough compression to need the good stuff...

    Bud informed me that the factory had an in tank fuel pump. I will go looking around for it today as I would like to drain the old gas out of the tank... Maybe I can re-engage it, with a pressure regulator, and the problem is solved. More questions to follow I am sure.
     
  9. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    The fuel injected Imperials used two fuel filters in parallel (has two “Y” fittings, one before and one after the filters). There is no reason to change it to a single filter, unless wanted to take some extra work to change it over. Dual filters won’t hurt a thing.

    All the carbureted FMJ vehicles had three metal lines running from front to rear on passenger side (under floorpan). The two-door cars are a bit shorter than 4-door cars are, but otherwise the three lines are the same for all FMJ’s (except for yours).
    5/16” is fuel supply line.
    3/16” is fuel return line.
    Both line nipples are under the alternator area on frame rail.
    1/4” (aka 4/16") is fuel vapor line. This nipple goes a bit more forward and connects to the black charcoal canister (by radiator).
    J fuel lines.JPG

    20190701_162430 r.jpg
    The black fitting (hard to see) and green arrow is where fuel return would go on a non/FI car.

    In the rear of car, the two metal fuel lines connect to the fuel sending unit on fuel tank. The fuel vapor line most likely connects to a fitting on top side of tank (the fuel vapor attachment varies between the years).

    On the L/F frame rail, close to the firewall (under car – same area as your fuel filters are currently located at) there are three (additional) rubber hoses. One for each of the three metal lines.

    The Imperial fuel lines (both) then go up along the firewall (blue line, above picture). All other car types, the fuel lines go forward along the fuel rail to the fuel pump area.

    If you are considering replacing the electric with a mechanical pump, you might want to either bend the lines (or run new metal lines) from fuel filters area. The mechanical pump area is not ideal, but I’ve seen a lot of cars that have installed electrical pumps in same area (under alternator). Either way, that location is still better than up high like that. Then purchase a small block fuel line (used or whatever) and adapt it to carburetor or make a new metal line for that as well. That would simplify the carburetor area, a bit.

    There should be a metal box with wires coming out of it, attached to the fuel line, that some might think of a fuel pump (at first glance), that counts how much fuel is used and reports to the dash. It is part of what is needed for dash to work correctly. This item needs to be attached to fuel line after return fuel attachment.
    BudW
     
  10. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    Good info BudW, Thank you!

    I will go looking for the metal box/fuel flow sensor tomorrow. I've not seen it as of yet, but there are a few electrical gizmos that I do not recognize. The FSM is supposed to arrive by Saturday.

    I am familiar with some of what you are saying, as I have just replaced the two metal fuel filters with two new 3/8 filters. Could it be that the EFI cars had 3/8 line? I set out to use 5/16 and had to update my plan. Using EFI rated hose, as I am of the understanding that it stands up to E10 better over time....That EFI hose is kinda spendy at about $6/Ft locally, but I may as well do it once, and then it is good for another decade or so.

    Also dropped the tank, to investigate about the fuel pump. The pump has all ready been removed.... Which reminds me that I forgot to re-connect the vent hose, so the tank is coming out again tomorrow night. I am going to try and use the factory EFI wiring to power my present carter in line electric pump in the new location. At present I am thinking it will fit pretty well between the tank and that hard rubber shield between the tank and the rear axle pumpkin..

    The Previous owner may have been having dirty fuel issues.. as there was one fuel filter at the tank in addition to the two in parallel up front.. all of which the the unfortunate electric fuel pump was trying to pull fuel through.. NO idea if that is why the car was parked.. But it could not have helped anything!
     
  11. kmccabe56

    kmccabe56 Active Member

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    The factory service manual is the best place for you to START. Along with the FSMs, you should also keep an eye out on ebay or abebooks.com for a complete set of the factory Technical Service Bulletins. They may show up as a loose collection in a three ring binder, or you may also find them in a bound book that Chrysler issued after the model year was over. This is probably your best bet to ensure that you get a complete set.

    Whether or not you can install an otherwise stock mechanical fuel pump depends entirely on whether or not Chrysler machined the face on the block (and drilled and tapped the two mounting holes for the pump). It's probably there, but don't be too surprised if it's not.

    If you go up one size on the first number go down one size on the second number. So from 215/75/15 go to a 225/60/15 tire. Vastly bigger footprint and the circumference won't be significantly different and throw off the speedometer.

    Lastly, your car is not a "J" body. Chrysler referred to Imperials as "Y" bodies. Yes, lots similar to FMJ cars, but also lots unique to the "Y". The FSMs and the TSBs will clear that up.
     
  12. 1982 IMP

    1982 IMP New Member

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    I just converted mine over the winter to a carb and mechanical pump.A block off plate for the fuel pump was on the engine and the eccentric was also on the engine,all from the factory.My dad bought the car when it was six months old so I know it was all factory.
     
  13. ChryslerCruiser

    ChryslerCruiser Member

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    I have been leaning towards a rear mounted electric fuel pump. It seems like the best solution to modern day fuel issues.. A mechanical fuel pump is cheaper, and probably faster.. and maybe even more reliable... except for heat soak issues. So It is a bit of a dilemma.

    The tires on the car are 205/75/15's The spare tire is a 225/70/15.. which could be the original spare, as it has some writing on it that says it it is a replacement for the two tires sized that I believe are bias-ply tires from the 70's something like an f-70-14 or I can not remember as it did not make sense to me.. but I am guessing the spare tire is an early 80's vintage.. and of course I like the looks of the 225-70-15 best.. so it would be nice if that was original..