A Gorgeous J Body in Mexico City 9-2017

J Body General Discussion

  1. marty mopar

    marty mopar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Location:
    Tempe AZ
    1405.JPG

    1406.JPG

    1407.JPG
     
  2. marty mopar

    marty mopar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Location:
    Tempe AZ
    So this gem was being towed by an old Opel that looked 60 times better than this sad ass Mopar.
    I still say the 80-83 Miradas and Cordobas have no equal in the pile of crap dept. as far as the quality
    of interior and exterior trim. This was perhaps on its way to the junk yard.

    Note the length of the tow chain....scary!!!!!

    Picture taken the day after the earthquake...I was in the airport when it hit.
    Weird when the ground moves and the lights overhead started to swing. You start to run...everybody did.
     
  3. MiradaMegacab

    MiradaMegacab Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,631
    Likes Received:
    436
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Location:
    Long Island NY
    Mirada TailLights.......
    Gotta love "The Club" steering wheel theft deterrent lock!
     
  4. 4speedjim

    4speedjim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    74
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Location:
    Portland NY
    Part->singular-< car. Gotta have one.
     
  5. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    666
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Location:
    North Texas
    I'm glad you survived the earthquake with no problems. We like having you here.
     
  6. marty mopar

    marty mopar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Location:
    Tempe AZ
    over 300 died, it was the 2nd one in a month. 10,000 died in the 1985 quake there.
    I made it through 2 hurricanes and an earthquake in 2 months in the northern part of the state of Puebla.
     
  7. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,337
    Likes Received:
    1157
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    We have been getting earthquakes every other week, in Oklahoma, in the last few years.

    I am no expert (far from it in this case), but I suspect the ground is settling from the absence of oil (being pumped out) which is holding the ground up - might be a possible cause.
    Oklahoma (and Mexico) are large oil producers.

    BudW
    Oklahoma City (home of the tornado-quakes)
     
  8. kkritsilas

    kkritsilas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,827
    Likes Received:
    353
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Crude oil doesn't hold up the ground, nor does the ground settle when it it removed. Conventional oil is a liquid, thick as it may be. If it were supporting the ground at some point, the enormous pressure if the ground above it would have made it flow to another location; there is no ground that oil is found in that is sealed up so tight that the oil would have been kept in place with that amount of pressure; that is why almost all oil deposits have some air space above them, and in most cases, water sitting on top of the oil.

    Alberta has both conventional and oil sands oil. No earthquakes have happened here for as long as any body can remember. And oil has been pumped out of the ground since about 1917, and even today, there is both oil being pumped, and oil drilling going on.
     
  9. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    666
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Location:
    North Texas
    perhaps its not the fracking but the fracking fluid being pumped in that is causing the quakes.

    Anecdotal but too much of a coincidence to be without validity:
    BudW in oklahoma having more than normal quakes since fracking started.
    My cousin in San Angelo, Texas with the same problem. No quakes and now quakes are frequent.
    My other cousin in Midland, Texas with the same problem.
    My college buds in Denton, Texas with quakes since fracking started.

    perhaps the geology of these lower 48 states is significantly different than the northern-canadian land?
     
  10. kkritsilas

    kkritsilas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,827
    Likes Received:
    353
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    The geology could be different, I guess, not really a geologist.

    Fracking, however, was invented here in Alberta. Reason for that is that some conventional oil deposits are too small to make it financially worth pulling out of the ground. At least in Alberta, some of the oil deposits are close together, but separated into smaller sections (think of the oil as being the water trapped in a sponge). Fracking (or more properly, hydraulic fracturing) breaks the barriers between the smaller deposits, allowing for fewer, but much larger pools, which then become financially feasible to pull out of the ground.

    Like I said, it isn't like this hasn't been done for years here, and there hasn't been an increase in earthquakes, but as you pointed out, maybe the underlying geology has something to do with it.

    A lot of stuff is perception, though. Like everybody thinks hurricanes are happening more often, and are higher intensity now. Viewed from a historical perspective, that isn't the case. Many people thought that the lull in hurricanse that we had between 2005 and last year was the norm. It wasn't, it was just a period in which the hurricanes were fairly few, and low intensity. Comparing even an average (average as in a historical average) year to what was going on from 2005-last year makes it seem like there is an increase, but it is a return to a closer to the average, not out of control weather. You get the same thing happening on a really hot day. You ask people on a hot day if they think global warming is real, and the percentage is significantly higher than when you ask people on a cold day.
     
  11. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,337
    Likes Received:
    1157
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    Everyone around here is blaming fracking. Personally I don’t think it has anything to do with it – if anything it would make the quakes smaller. It is my best uneducated guess.

    All I know is before 8ish years ago, we didn’t even know what an earthquake is, in Oklahoma.
    Now, we get like 10 times more than what California does.

    I’m not sure how long fracking has been around – but I would guess a lot longer than 10 years.

    Nothing else has changed around here (that I know of) and the quakes appear to be somewhat in areas of old drilling sites (old like 100 year old sites).

    Other than visit a few caves/caverns (less than 10) – I don’t know a thing about what is under ground and definitely had no schooling about it.
    Well, take that back, my kids school is teaching that petroleum is a dinosaur byproduct (solid waste) – which I sorta get (got me if true or not) and that dinosaurs were not everywhere (which I also get, sorta). I kind of get where and why there would be pockets of petroleum – but don’t fully understand why it is so deep.

    That said, if you drink from a soda bottle, but you place your lips around the end, and suck it out, the bottle collapses in on itself – which is my uneducated guess as to why the quakes.

    If I knew what it is from, exactly, I wouldn’t know what I know about automobiles.
    Maybe we have some aliens causing it?
    My opinion can be swayed and might not even remember what it was a couple of years ago.
    Also, this is not anything to argue about.

    It would be like be guessing on how many live bullet rounds there are currently in the world.
    I wouldn’t have a clue – but I will put out the first guess of 5,000 (total live ammo rounds, that exist in the world).
    Wait, that’s not right - I have at least that much in my gun safe. Make that guess of a total of 50,000 live rounds of ammo that exists in the world, right now.
    BudW
     
  12. kkritsilas

    kkritsilas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,827
    Likes Received:
    353
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Your kids are being sort of taught right, but not the complete story. The essence is right, the origin is off.

    Petroleum is decayed organic matter that was, over time, converted by bacteria into its current (semi, in some cases) liquid form. Most of it is NOT decayed dinosaurs, but sea plankton. In Alberta's case (and also true of the Middle East, by the way), many many millions of years ago, the land was under water. When the tectonic plates shifted, the land mass was pushed up above sea level (the Rocky mountains were formed at the same time). The water eventually either drained off or evaporated, and the plankton that was in the ocean prior to the landmass rising, died off and started to decay. Eventually, the plankton got buried, and the bacteria in the soil began to convert the dead plankton into petroleum. In Alberta's case, the type of bacteria and the lower oxygen content caused the petroleum to have a lot of sulfur in the petroleum, so we have "sour" petroleum. In Texas (commonly called "West Texas Intermediate"/WTI) the sulfur content is lower, so it is "intermediate", and Saudi Arabian and North Sea (common name is Brent) petroleum have very low sulfur content, so it is called "sweet".

    Fracking, as a technology has been around for 50 years or so. It is being used more often now as conventional oil wells begin to dry up. As well, when the world price of oil spiked up, that prompted companies to go after every little bit of oil that there was. A lot of the oil shale production is based on fracking, as the individual pockets of oil that are trapped in the shale are not worth drilling for. Before the world price of oil got high enough, there wasn't any money in trying to get the oil shale out, because conventional oil was priced so low. It is a higher cost of operation than the conventional oil, as not only do you have to do the fracking in the first place, you also need to separate out the oil from the bits of rock, and early on, the fracking mud as well.

    Not arguing, just a discussion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2017
  13. marty mopar

    marty mopar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Location:
    Tempe AZ
    Was working on my car and totally fracked it up.
     
  14. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    666
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Location:
    North Texas
    I know that in some parts of the lower 48 states, the lack of water in manmade reservoirs has a tendency to cause shakes. At least thats a current hypothesis.

    Seems the weight of the water kept land from shaking, then when you have years of drought the water weight is lifted from the land and things shake a bit more. Rather, like said above - it seems like it is more.

    I agree that the rise and fall of temps and water are well within norms... we humans just have such a short horizon that is seems like it is extreme. But when you look at it from a long term perspective, its just a small blip.

    Although when I'm outside working on the Chrysler, tractor or golf cart in the summer , I would swear the hot temps fell hotter. lol Could be I just need to sweat more.