Changing ignition lock in 79 LeBaron

Interior and Electrical

  1. Toro67

    Toro67 Active Member

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    Hi guys

    My ignition lock is a bit loose, so I have decided to change it.
    I just don´t want to break anything, and the Haynes manual is no help at all.
    The steering column is with tilt - pictures attached.
    I guess a lot of you have done this before - any tips ? :)

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  2. BudW

    BudW Well-Known Member

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    These are from my ’77 FSM (which should be identical to ’79).

    The Ignition Lock Cylinder removal is listed on the very first page. I included the rest of the pages in case you needed to go any further into your column for some reason.


    Now you got me wondering. Chrysler lock cylinders were made a bit on the loose side, back then.
    As long as it doesn’t feel like it is ready to fall out and is still working OK, I wouldn’t mess with it.
    BudW
     

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  3. Toro67

    Toro67 Active Member

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    Hi Bud
    Thanks for the pictures :) I don´t know if something is wrong with the lock, but since I am still chasing gremlins in the system and the key illumination is not working I would like to take it apart and inspect it.
     
  4. Toro67

    Toro67 Active Member

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    Got rid of the annoying buzzer sound for the seat belt by just disconnecting the wire under the seat - Good tip from another thread.
    Took out the battery in the process and sadly the tray had rotted through. Can these be obtained as aftermarket parts ?
    I was then going through the engine bay looking for loose wires when I saw some gunk under the lower radiator hose. When I moved the hose away from the frame I noticed that something hard was inside it. Like plastic rings with a certain space between them ?? Could this be the case or is just old (hard) gunk ? ?
    The engine has no cooling issues as far as I can tell.
    I have a new radiator hose ready, and I was going to change the coolant at some point.
     
  5. Toro67

    Toro67 Active Member

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    OK so the "gunk" in the lower radiator hose was a long metal spring... I can only assume it´s been put in there to keep the hose from collapsing from vacuum ? But when would it do this ? Never seen it before.

    A little later after a google:
    So the spring is not a spring but just a piece of twisted metal designed to keep the hose from collapsing when filled with coolant on the assembly line. They used vacuum to get rid of the air faster, hence the coil..
    So from this I can also assume that my hose is the original 38 year old one. Better change it..
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
  6. BudW

    BudW Well-Known Member

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    Rubber deteriorates over time and a bit faster if in the sun. It doesn’t matter if tires (dry-rot), belts or hoses, control arm bushings, etc.

    My test for hoses (others may have other opinions – which is fine) is if a hose has to be removed for a repair (a heater core would be a good example) or if hoses are 5-7 years old or older, I would recommend replacing them - if car is to be used for long journeys or daily driven.
    Hoses, even new ones, will fail. Older hoses have a higher tendency to fail.

    My second opinion, is to squeeze the hose. I do know that hoses will be somewhat firm, but they should not be “rock hard” or not flexible.
    This is kinda hard to explain, but if you have a new hose and old hose together (of the same hose) then give each a squeeze and you will know better on what I’m talking about. Old hoses will get hard (not pliable) after time.

    Hard items do not flex – they break. Hoses have to flex or will burst.

    Note: heater hoses can be very hard to remove from the soft tubes - if left in place for a long time. Generally, for the cost of heater hose being cheaper than finding a heater core, I generally will remove the heater hose clamps, then give the hose a firm twist. If it pops loose, great. If not, then cut a slit in direction of hose, at heater core, then peal the old hoses off. I have personally damaged way too many good heater cores, when cutting them off is so much faster (and less damaging).


    Belts are kinda in the same category – but for a different reason. They wear at the pulley groves – and they do get hard as well. Hard belts do not get traction, like soft belts do.

    I think it is safe to say that just about everyone knows of a person that has a car that tossed off the drive belt or had a drive belt break on them.
    Personally – I don’t want to be the one broke down on side of road – on something like a broken belt or popped hose – when I could have had prevented it.


    Next subject – the lower spring hose.
    I have no idea why new hoses do not come with that spring in place. Most people will replace that lower hose and never see the spring – thereby not having it/getting it re-installed.
    Not having that spring in the lower hose, will give a person cooling system problems – to no end.

    To back up a bit, the upper hose is water coming from engine (which is hot) and dumps into radiator top tank. As coolant goes down the radiator tubes it cools off. The water pump then sucks the “cooler” coolant from bottom tank of radiator. That means the lower hose is under a constant suction.
    Without that spring, it will collapse restricting (or cutting off completely) any “cool” coolant into engine.


    TIP for everyone: If going to an auto salvage or pull-a-part, grab a lower radiator hose (or the spring within it) from any older Chrysler rear wheel drive vehicle (vans and pickups included up to ’93 – for they all use the same spring) and put that spring in your spare parts bin.

    You never know, you might purchase a vehicle (or have a friend with) with overheating problems – and re-installing that spring back into the lower radiator hose most likely will fix that problem
    BudW
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
  7. volare 77

    volare 77 Well-Known Member

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    The key light could be simple like a bad bulb or the time delay relay. IIRC, the cover should just pull off to access the bulb.
     
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