Lean burn delete. Wiring clean up

Engines, Exhaust and Fuel Systems

  1. picklesgarage

    picklesgarage Well-Known Member

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    So one of the prior owners either did or had done a delete. Should have made this a better running car but whoever did the wiring was a hack. And that is being nice. They used wire nuts and lamp cord to do this. And I'm thinking at this point the poor connections are causing my hard starts and poor "performance". If I'm reading the diagram correctly from the lean burn delete sticky I should have a splice from the blue wire at the voltage regulator to the resistor block and the other side should go to the coil? Does the block need to be grounded or is it ok to be zip tied to the fender brace? The module (orange box) needs to be mounted and grounded to the chassis if not to the negative or the battery and the battery ground needs to be good? Other then shorting up the rats nest of wires from the conversion since they are just bundled with a zip tie and I missing anything else I need to do?
     
  2. picklesgarage

    picklesgarage Well-Known Member

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    Picture for reference

    IMG_20200511_1056571_rewind.jpg
     
  3. Mikes5thAve

    Mikes5thAve Well-Known Member

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    The ballast resistor (cable tied to the support rod) should really be bolted to the fire wall.
    The connection to blue wire doesn't have to be at the votlage regulator it can be from anywhere with the appropriate power. There are several areas it can come from, all going back to the same source.
    The coil side goes to the coil and a "start" wire which is whatever smaller wire at the starter relay has power whenever the key is turned to start.
    The "run" wire is probably the one you mentioned at the voltage regulator.
     
  4. Mikes5thAve

    Mikes5thAve Well-Known Member

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    One more note since it wont let me edit:
    Ballast resistor isn't grounded but does have power in those wires and should be installed in a more permanent way and location that reduces the risk of anything touching or damaging it.
     
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  5. picklesgarage

    picklesgarage Well-Known Member

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    Mikes5thAve. this is why i ask these questions. seems like whoever did this just didnt care or know what they were doing. I'm amazed as to that it even was running the more i deal with the job that was done. for example i just finished removing and repairing the fix that was done for the drivers power seat. they had used lamp cord and a wall light switch to run power to the seat from the battery with no fuse to the seat instead of fixing the corroded power wire that is right next to the door sill. i had pictures of it and i can no longer find them. still surprised there hadnt been a fire or something bad from that
     
  6. picklesgarage

    picklesgarage Well-Known Member

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    Looks a lot nicer. Seems to start and run better as well. New batter and new ground cable might help too

    IMG_20200513_1107342_rewind.jpg
     
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  7. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    The ballast resistor gets hot when in operation. Hotter than boiling water (or will make water boil when it makes contact with a hot resistor).
    It doesn't “have” to be bolted down, per se, but sense it is ceramic, it can break if it hits something sharply (like a pothole) - but I would highly encourage for it to be bolted down. Also, it can melt wiring or anything “plastic” if its gets close enough to touch it. A zip tie will melt, in time.

    The ignition box needs to have a good ground. A poor ground is the source of a lot of headaches trying to find performance/hard start issues.
    If you think about it, the body is painted, the module is painted. The screw is not painted and the thickness of the drilled-through sheet metal shouldn't have any paint – so there is a lot of possibility of having a poor ground (or no ground).
    The same thing applies to the voltage regulator – but to a lesser degree
    BudW
     
  8. picklesgarage

    picklesgarage Well-Known Member

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    BudW, pretty sure the poor connections and bad grounds were causing most of of my hard start issues after the tuneup. Currently after fixing it starts as well as a new car if not better. It was worth the time and effort to clean up that mess