rearr quarter extensions

tim berry

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I'd be interested if they undertake this. I worked in the plastics industry for years, so I know what it would take. I can't imaging they would create a mold to injection mold the piece. Unless they can create a short-term disposable mold out of sand or something. Real molds can cost up to $100,000. I wonder if they could create a cheap mold and thermoform the parts. You can make those kind of molds out of anything. Issue with thermoforming is it is not as precise and can warp (which is why our OEM parts have the injection molded plastic frame in there).

I hope they can make this work, but I'd see a price of around $750-$1000. The way I look at it, a proper fitting part will save you a ton of time and body shop work. If you are using a body shop, that can cost a lot making the current stuff fit. My body guy gave up and used my a set of older original ones I had hoarded (but were all there) and rebuilt over them. Holding up so far, fingers crossed
Thanks for the comments .
I think your cost structure is spot on . I'm open to all suggestions .
I'll look into who does thermo forming in my area when time permits .
 

greyghoast

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late to this topic ever thought about seeing if replica plastics want to sell their molds
 

greyghoast

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i know people say they suck just wonder if the mold could be reworked
 

Cordoba1

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I've said this in other threads: Two J-Bodies ago, my rear extensions were cracked in several places. I sourced the replicas on eBay, and my body guy (like everyone else) said they were pretty bad. He suggested using fiberglass to fix the existing units. I told him to go for it, and I was very pleased with the outcome. The finished product looked OEM, but didn't have the flex like OEM units. So as long as there is enough left of the originals to use as a general shape, applying fiber and two-part epoxy is an excellent, low cost option. Unless they are too far gone, or they are basically missing, it is an excellent option.
 

Ele115

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If you have really trashed end caps, but you have them still and plan on keeping the car a while, IF IT WERE MINE, I would make them from steel, then finish them in lead to get them perfectly smooth. Then DP-90 and paint. They would never need anything again. No warpage, very strong. Super easy to work with. That's just me
 

tim berry

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You have to have the tools and skills for that and I don't have time to hone my skills to a level that I require.
But if you would make them for a reasonable cost I would buy them from you .
 

Ele115

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Depending on what you have in your hands, try to fiberglass them or the black stuff GM sells for rubber bumper repair
 
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