Seat track modification in F wagon?

old yellow 78

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Almost all of my time now is being used up renovating yet another house, so my wagon is just sitting, and sitting, with the dash still ripped apart and the passenger mirror still not put on. It has also been banished - again - from its garage in favor of appliances, cabinets, drywall, and lumber. But, I do spend a lot of time thinking about it while I've been demo-ing the kitchen and bathrooms. One thing that I would like to do when I'm done with this house and can get back to my toys, is move the drivers side 60/40 seat rearwards about two or three inches more than can be done with just adjusting it back as far as it will go. I'm a tall and big guy, and without having a tilt wheel, it is annoyingly tight getting in and out. I have been trying to figure out how I could do this without drilling new holes in the floorpan. I have thought about making some sort of bracket out of flat stock - which would work fine if the seat bolts came up from the floor, but since the bolts are mounted on the seat tracks and go down through the floor, I don't see how that could work. Has anyone done this sort of modification? Any ideas? Perhaps I could lose some weight, but that isn't going to make me any shorter.

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Mikes5thAve

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Wow talk about a 70s interior :) it all looks so clean.

Don't forget in addition to holes that the area the seat bolts down is also reinforced underneath. May be it's easier to convert to tilt wheel.
 

Duke5A

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I did something similar, but went two inches to the inside rather than backwards. I wanted buckets, but also wanted it all to match. Was able find another passenger seat and made some adapters out of angle iron.

You're probably just going to have to take it all apart and look at it. I think it would be easier to to go with the bracket approach between the frame and the seat rather than modifying what it already there.

I also wouldn't use flat stock either unless it was really thick.


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old yellow 78

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May be it's easier to convert to tilt wheel.
Yep, thought of that, but to find a tilt column with manual floor shift - well, probably easier to find Jimmy Hoffa.
I think it would be easier to to go with the bracket approach between the frame and the seat
Humm... I don't know how the seat track is attached to the seat itself, but it is worth a look. I might be able to make up something like what you did. Thanks for the idea!
Thanks! I will look them up. I remember my uncle got a new '76 Volare sedan "company car" and disliked it for this same reason. He was quite heavy and was never comfortable driving it.

All great ideas guys! Thanks!
 

Duke5A

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I've seen non-power tracks before. If memory serves what I would do is use two pieces of angle that are three inches or so longer than the track itself. Just lay them on top letting the excess length hang off the back and secure the seat to that. Use the original bolt holes in the track to secure the angle iron and drill four new holes in the angle for the seat.
 

Mikes5thAve

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For the non shifter column I've see people before use parts from a k car or GM mixed with an 80s M body tilt column to accomplish that.

After seeing Duke5A's pics i think he right, easiest way is probably move the seat back on the track. If you can drill a new front hole you'd only have to extend the back.
 
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