89 5th ave/M body radio replacements

Interior and Electrical

  1. Ele115

    Ele115 Well-Known Member

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    What did that originally come out of? It looks right at home. The one in my 88 came from a Jeep I think, still works fine
     
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  2. Camtron

    Camtron Active Member

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    Pulled it out of a late 90s Jeep Cherokee. Was a direct fit/replacement. I Couldn’t be happier to have music again.
     
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  3. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    Bud, what I was getting at is, the VIN is programmed into the radio for anti-theft BUT also the radio must "talk" to other modules or it won't work. I've seen the audio module be the cause of a no start because it was faulty and took down the module communication network, and the BCM couldn't talk to the PCM. If the BCM gets a signal from the ignition "switch" but can't tell the PCM to power the starter relay, the engine won't crank. If it's got pushbutton start, look out.:confused: It's ridiculous nowdays. Also some of them, what you see in the dash is only a control panel. The actually audio module (a.k.a. radio) might be in the trunk. If it has navigation and an external amp, which also is programmed to the vehicle,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,HELP! lol
    Right there is one reason I can't see anyone restoring say, a 2019 Challenger, in 30 or 40 years. It will be all but impossible and if it's possible, it'll be VERY expensive.
     
  4. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    Aspen500, we might be getting about off the original topic a bit, but I agree with you 100% (well maybe in real high 99.9’s%). A person just can’t take a “known good (fill in the blank)" to plug it into todays cars for testing purposes anymore. Well, not without the VIN burned into it by dealership or local shop with proper (and expensive) equipment.

    On (my) post #11, the last two radios will not physically fit our cars (without heavy modification) and then the electronics won’t work without some serious and major changes. I can appreciate the anti-theft measures car have nowadays, but I believe todays electronics have gone way way too far in the opposite direction. My wife’s current 2010 Town and Country as well as her previous 2002 Town and Country – all the computers talk to each other at startup. If one is kaput or the VIN doesn’t match, well, time to get out the tennis shoes, because you are now walking.

    The 2002 van was actually my parents van before they got a new one themselves (we bought it from them). About 5 years ago, the engine computer died. Sense dealerships today are not my favorite (plus I don’t pay anyone for labor that I can do myself), I sent my ECM off to get rebuilt. The ECM wasn’t 100% functional when I got it back, so I had to give it back to them. I don’t think the unit I got back the second time was the same one – but it at least worked. That is the problem with Chryslers (well . . . any make) is you just can’t replace any computer (engine, transmission, ABS (brakes), suspension (if equipped), body, A/C, seat memory (if equipped), radio (even the low end radios), anti-collusion (if equipped), parking assist (RADAR), noise reduction (if equipped), and so forth, built in the last 20 years – or nothing works.

    I can remember people stealing radios back in the ‘70’s (which, even now, I don’t understand why). You don’t hear (as much) about car parts being stolen now days. It is more about carjacking (which some might consider being worse – possibly).

    On a side note, I have seriously thought about finding a rolled Charger (or something) and robbing the powertrain and electronics to install into something like a M-body. An engine like a 3.5L has plenty of power for daily driving and an 8-speed transmission would allow a person to install 3.55 gears, without issue. ABS, navigation and backup camera would be nice. The fuel mileage and parts availability would be a lot better, as well as drivability. The downside (which is a big downside) is the electronics and all the time (and $) to retrofit. Would be nice to drive, maybe even to diagnosis -, but I just don't see it being worth the effort.
    My wife’s 2010 van (still) gives me an error message about a side proximity sensor system failure – which is becoming a royal pain with the error message popping up every 10 minutes or so. The side proximity sensor is only $960.00 (plus labor).
    BudW
     
  5. Ele115

    Ele115 Well-Known Member

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    I've seen a lot of the newer stuff where the stereo stuff is tied to the A/C so the volume goes up to compensate for higher blower speeds. People mess with the stereo then they have to take it to the stealership because their A/C won't work and their instruments are going haywire, if the car starts at all. The cars now are just a big wireless network on wheels and the class 8 stuff is catching up. Don't even get me statred on heavy truck. Life is only good in that world if you're towing them.
     
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  6. Jonnyuma

    Jonnyuma Well-Known Member

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    I was learning some interesting stuff in the thread's original topic, but the drift holds my interest too.
    My Ram 1500 is an '02, the 4.7l V8 is pre-hemi era and there ain't nuthin' you can feasibly do to that little 4.7 to make it happy about hauling around a 5000# truck.
    Find a wrecked 5.9 Hemi, right? Nope. Even if I took the engine, trans, computers, and all wiring theres no way to get it to talk to the dash, radio, secondary electrical system, at all.
    I hope the engine/trans lasts a good long time, the truck is too clean to be disposed of painlessly... it would be a VERY hard decision on whether to fix or replace. Expensive either way.
     
  7. Oldiron440

    Oldiron440 Well-Known Member

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    Didn't the 02 come with a magnum, the reason I ask is that I had a 05 with the 4.7 and I thought that the small block swap was a bolt in with parts from an 02 Magnum pickup.
    I sold the truck and didn't do the swap because of the wiring problems with the dash.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  8. Ele115

    Ele115 Well-Known Member

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    Be glad you don't have the new Silverado with the 4 Cyl.
     
  9. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    The 4.7L is a lost cause (imo). I’m not even sure tossing 15k Dollar into the engine will amount to anything.
    The 5.7L engine is a different story.

    The LA small block transmission bolt pattern is the same as a 4.7L (and 5.7L Hemi’s). The flexplate is unique and the starters are a little different (as well as the 5.7L’s) because the mounting bolts go from rear to front (where LA’s mounting bolts go from front to rear).
    Unrelated, the passenger "cars" 5.7L’s have the starter on passenger side of car – which is different because it shares the same transmission bolt pattern. The truck starters are still on drivers side.

    The 5.9L Magnum was used in ’02 ½ ton and ’03 pickups – until the 5.7L Hemi’s were into production (a mid-year change).
    I was told not many ‘03’s came with the 5.9L from a friend in dealer – but have no way to back up that fact. I know a lot of blown ’02/03 4.7L’s were swapped out with 5.2/5.9L Magnums, with a harness and engine computer – so maybe you can find some parts. The 5.7L is a harder changeover (plus more expense).
    BudW
     
  10. Darth-Car

    Darth-Car Well-Known Member

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    The brand X boys out there mock the 5.7's, because they say the cams go bad in them leading to a large repair bill.

    We have a 5.7 in Momma's 08 Chrysler Aspen. It's a fun motor for a large truck. :)
     
  11. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    I hadn’t heard of anyone with camshaft or lifter problems with one, yet.

    I've seen a couple 5.7L’s drop a valve seat – and that will ruin a block and head very quick (on any engine). I’ve also seen a few break piston ring lands when boosted – but not seen any major engine damage when that happens on one (…yet).

    The 5.7L (and variations) seam to be a great running and well-built engine – even if 100% of ‘em come from Mexico. The 4.7L and the 2.7L (older LH’s) engines are to be avoided (IMO).
    BudW
     
  12. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    About all we've seen at work with the 5.7 Hemi is broken valve springs and even then, not very many. Did have one with a bad cam due to a failed roller on a lifter. It was a cylinder deactivation engine and we had a heck of time finding lifters (b/o from Chrysler indefinitely at the time, and no aftermarket). Finally found a dealer in Minnesota that had a complete engine set in stock.

    Yeah, the 4.7L...…………………………...I am not impressed, all sorts of trouble with those, usually terminal. Dropped valve seats, blown headgaskets, failed timing chains ( and they are an interference engine), cam followers falling off for no obvious reason, etc, etc, etc. Almost no such thing as a good used one (the few out there are like $4,500 and you take your chances) and a reman is close to $7,000 lastr I saw plus labor, which pretty much means the truck goes on it's final ride, on the back of a salvage yard rollback.
    I concur on the 2.7L, should be avoided like the plague.
     
  13. Darth-Car

    Darth-Car Well-Known Member

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    My experience with those 4.7's came in WJ Grand Wagoneers. They all ran well, but both had to have head gaskets done due to coolant in the oil. Low mileage ones are to be avoided, because they have very narrow oil passages that tend to clog with that short city, low mileage driving. If you find one with around 160k, to 200k that is the one to buy, because it has been driven for long regular stretches, most likely where the engine has gotten up to temperature, and kept things cleaned out.
     
  14. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    Most important is, maintenance. Changing the oil every 3,000 miles or so (depending on how/where it's driven) will extend the life a ton. Better still, synthetic oil because it tends to no sludge, varnish, turn to crust, vaporize and plug the pcv system, etc........changed at no more than 5,000 miles. The vast majority of engines at work, where the timing chains are shot well before 100K miles, or the variable cam timing system is non-functional, the cylinder deactivation engines with failed lifters (among other things), are ones that have changed oil "when the minder on the dash says to" or used conventional oil when it says right on the oil cap that synthetic is required, had 10,000 mile oil change intervals, etc... When you open them up, the black crust is 1/4 thick. Same holds for the 4.7L (and ALL engines).
    What does any of that have to do with radio's? I guess nothing, sorry!:oops: