Volare Wagon - T/A Kit Racer Stance

Projects & Restorations

  1. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    Pile of parts awaiting install:

    ART Sub frame connectors (Final batch)
    FF K-frame aluminum pucks
    FF Rear Iso delete kit w/ sway bar mounts
    Westar and Marmon HD Engine and Trans mounts
    FF Fast Ratio Pitman/Idler arms
    FF 11/16" Tie rod kit
    FF Tubular upper control arms
    Proforged HD lower balljoints
    Energy Suspension Black Poly LCA bushing kit
    FF 1-1/8" Front swaybar
    FF 7/8" Rear swaybar
    Vi-King Warrior bound/rebound adjustable shocks all around

    Awaiting availability:
    FF HD torsion bars
    FF LCA bracing

    I should find some way to document before/after. Maybe record through some specific backroad twisties hard-mounted with hoodline and steering wheel as reference points. I'll work on this.
     
  2. DCAspen

    DCAspen Well-Known Member

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    Nice selection of parts,Keep us updated,Should ride like a slot car with all those goodies.
     
  3. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree on what DCAspen said.

    Only two comments to mention:
    might be a big harsh for daily driving. All of the other parts will car feel and handle better - except for possibly the shocks (no information about them to say one way or the other).
    My experience with urethane or polyurethane bushings for both upper and lower control arms is they are a bit "too stiff" for street usage. For racing, go for it.
    You will appreciate some rubber between the you and the pebbles, grass and bugs you drive over - before it shakes your kidneys to a different location in your body.
    I recommend to go Poly (or urethane) for all suspension parts, except for upper/lower control arm bushings - or at least get a second set of lower control arms and get new rubber installed - so if poly is too stiff for ya, it won't be hard to swap 'em out.

    My other comment is . . . it sounds like you have a lighter wallet, now . . .
    BudW
     
  4. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    I do have an old set of Moog rubber control arm bushings laying around from my Chrysler that I never put in. I'll keep them handy as a Plan B.

    And yes... I told you Firm Feel would remember my name.
     
  5. Duke5A

    Duke5A Well-Known Member

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    I'm hoping for lots photos of this build. :) This is basically porn for me... :confused::eek:

    Can you post a photo of those upper control arms? I had to modify mine to clear. That piece of flat stock reinforcement between the bars has to be clearanced in the middle, otherwise it will it when the suspension is unloaded. FF admitted this to me and said they were going to redesign them. I think I did the install like six or seven years ago.
     
  6. Raff

    Raff Well-Known Member

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    I think you'll be on their Xmas card list this year!! Keep us posted with lots of pics. Car looks awesome.
     
  7. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    Got these to put in...

    2019-05-15.jpg


    I'm waiting on rebuilding the front end so I can do it all in a single K frame drop. But I did want to slip these new FFI aluminum pucks in for reasons you can probably gather from the following photo.

    2019-05-19.jpg

    Warning to anyone thinking they were going to loosen the Kframe, drop it a couple inches with a pole jack, and "slide" spacers in; There is a metal guide sleeve tacked to the upper bushing retainer (traveling though both halves of the rubber bushing) that will NOT allow you to slide the top bushing out without a good 4" of clearance... but as you lower the Kframe the upper control arms contact the top of the frame rails right around the 3" mark.

    OOPS! Your options are now...

    A) Disconnect the upper control arm mounting plates from the K frame uprights.
    -or-
    B) Cut the exposed inch of metal guide sleeve off so the upper bushing can slide out.

    Anyone here know what "flat rate pay" is? I didn't take any photos myself but it goes a little something like...

    REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
    DblVdjlW4AI-Nlm.jpg


    And then everything is just fine.


    2019-05-19.jpg
     
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  8. Duke5A

    Duke5A Well-Known Member

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    Love it! Easily one of my favorite builds.

    Extremely interested in your feedback on those shocks too.
     
  9. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    I've been doing my research on damper adjustment so as to do them justice. "Flat Ride" or "Fast Settling" suspension design is an interesting concept I'd like to play with. 15-20% higher rear ride frequency to limit the need for damping and therefore reduce the effects of jacking (up or down depending on your Compression/Rebound settings). It just so happens that these cars tend to have higher rear ride frequency in the first place, thanks to the torsion bars, making the theory pretty easy to test.
     
  10. XfbodyX

    XfbodyX Well-Known Member

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    Nice, whats the PN on the front shocks?
     
  11. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    They built all 4 to order under kit "VSK2001" (fronts listed as "B2001" and rears as "B2008"). I didn't see any stud/stud numbers available in the universal fitment list and I got spooked so I called up Viking and they happily verified the correct mounting hardware and operating dimensions for me over the phone. Great customer service.

    I AM going to suggest waiting for me to install and test clearance on those adjuster knobs though. The shock clearance hole in the K frame upright looks pretty tight. I'll get on it.
     
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  12. XfbodyX

    XfbodyX Well-Known Member

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    For comparison sake if you get a chance can you measure the shock body and the diameter of the adjusted knobs?

    Ive been wanting to try Viking units because ive heard alot of good about them.

    If they wont clear up front because of the adjuster diameter I wonder if you could fit or make some smaller ones.

    I use a different brand with a 6 inch circumference body and adjusters exactly the size of a common dime.

    Viking was founded in 2011 by the two top guys from QA1 and im told the quality has gone downhill although ive had no issues with my older ones.

    DSC00080.JPG

    DSC00081.JPG

    DSC00082.JPG

    DSC00083.JPG
     
  13. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    6.25" girth and the same knobs. Although they might be positioned closer together. And they ARE mounted on the bottom (lower control arm) side so they should have the best chance of clearing everything.

    2019-05-20.jpg
     
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  14. XfbodyX

    XfbodyX Well-Known Member

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    Great info, thanks!
     
  15. 89.Fifth

    89.Fifth Well-Known Member

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    This a great build thread. What did FFI say about HD Torsion bar availability?
     
  16. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    They have a few buyers lined up and they have a production run planned. Sounded like it would be a few month ordeal in all.
     
  17. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    The upper control arm plates do need to come off to do the job correctly.

    A method I have used in the past (when not dropping the entire K-frame down), is to:
    First EITHER Measure the distance from floor to fender well and record somewhere. I recommend adding a piece of masking tape so measurement location will remain the same. OR the official way is to measure from floor to bottom of control arm bushing (and record) – which is not as easy to perform.

    Loosen all four K-frame bolts. Drilling a small hole into frame rail to insert rust penetrating oil straw (or less preferred, WD40) to soak the bolts, a couple of tiles, a couple of days in advanced – might be recommended. Also, use penetrating fluid on the four upper control arm studs (easier to access with front wheels off) and on the torsion bar adjustment bolt threads.

    Remove front wheels

    Remove the plates that cover the upper control arm fasteners, from inside of engine compartment. Depending on year of production, it would be painted black steel, or unfinished aluminum plates – as shown in red circle (under the air cleaner hose)).
    20170503_161425 r.jpg
    For my personal cars, I like to leave the plates off - so that way the alignment shop wont lose or damage the plates or screws. Then reattach the plates once happy with the alignment.

    Support the K-frame from below. A transmission jack attachment works great in this case (if accessible).

    Loosen the tension from torsion bars via the adjustment bolts. They do not need to be completely loose but mostly loose does make job go faster. If you measure now many turns you make – helps on getting the ride height back, faster.

    Remove the four upper control arm nuts from bolt/studs (blue arrow, below).
    77 FSM pg 2-12c m.jpg

    Loosen all eight support bracket (red arrow and purple circles, above) to K-frame bolts. Remove the four bolts and plate on Left side – but don’t remove the Right side, yet (there is a reason for doing Left first).

    With car supported (on a lift or on jack stands) and K-frame support, remove the four 4 K-frame bolts.

    Lower K-frame down. The Right side bracket will contact the frame after a certain distance – which should allow the Left side to drop down, more. Some cases, the Left side rear bushing will slip out – sometimes not. If not, it is time to get out the Sawzall and cut through the bushing and metal insert to remove. I would plan on keeping the saw nearby, just in case. Install the Left side solid mounts (leave bolts out for now, or things will bind up later. Raise K-frame up and re-install the Left side support bracket and be sure the odd-looking control arm bolts are in place, first. Go ahead and tighten the bolts attaching the bracket to the K-frame to 50 ft/lbs. (222 nm).

    Repeat for Right side, but for me, most often the bushings will pop right out (no saw needed – in most cases).

    Once the Right side support bracket is reattached, then install the four K-frame bolts. Once all four bolts are in and sung, tighten to specs (see below).

    Attach both sides upper control arms and tighten nuts down to 150 ft/lbs. (667 nm). Note alignment will be off so you will need to get car aligned afterwards!

    Turn torsion bar bolts back to the number of turns you loosened them to, to get ride height back to an approximate height.
    The official factory ride height (lower part of lower control arm bushing to ground) is:
    1977 FSM (Factory Service Manual) is 10½” (266.7 mm)
    1982-1989 FSM is 12½” (317.5 mm)
    I don’t have the official specs for other year FMJ’s.
    If you measured the fender well height earlier, you can still use that to get back to original height (which doesn’t mean it is correct). Changing the ride height does affect most alignment angles – so it is good idea to take time to get right height correct, before taking car to get aligned.
    Also, once you have the correct ride height set, using the fender well measurement will work for future reference.

    Torque specs are:
    K-frame bolts (unless the solid mount supplier suggests otherwise): 80 ft/lbs. (355 nm)
    Upper control arm nuts: 150 ft/lbs. (667 nm)
    Support to K-frame bolts: 50 ft/lbs. (222 nm)
    Upper control arm pivot arm to bushing nuts (for bushing replacement, only) 110 ft/lbs. (489 nm)
    BudW
     
  18. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    I mean, you can see why I left the alignment and ride height untouched, lifted the car over my head, and just committed to a cutoff wheel like the job only paid an hour, right?

    Let me play you the song of my people...


     
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  19. Opticon77

    Opticon77 Well-Known Member

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    846K4BI.jpg
     
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  20. Raff

    Raff Well-Known Member

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