Tractors and Other Thangs

General Non Automotive Discussions

  1. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    That possum in the commercial looked just like the one in the truck!

    The one I had never played dead, he just kept snarling at me. lol

    You know, I could trap another one for you and bring it up when I visit assuming it stays alive til the summer so I can go for a ride. No way I want to be stuck shoveling snow and wondering if the thermometer is stuck at nearly ZERO degrees.

    Aspen500 you do realize that is cold, don't you??

    JW
     
  2. Oldiron440

    Oldiron440 Well-Known Member

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    LOL;)
     
  3. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    A few years ago, I was working in my (detached) garage and found a huge possum making noise in the corner. I confronted him (it?), and it looked like he fainted. Grabbed some thick leather gloves, grabbed him by the scruff of the neck, carried it out to far corner of my acreage, and let him go.

    I could fit both of our chihuahua dogs inside of this possum – if one wanted to try (it was huge).
    BudW
     
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  4. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    Oh hell yes I realize that is cold! It gets worse, "high" Friday -4. Seriously???????
    We've got rabbits, squirrels, and killer chipmunks, mostly. No possums, raccoons, or snakes of any kind. Then there's that thing I've never seen, only heard in the middle of the night, out in my backyard. Not sure what it is but it sounds like a cat, a REALLY BIG cat. The snarling sound it makes is enough for me to NOT go out with a flashlight and try to get a glimpse. When you see bark clawed off trees 5 feet from the ground and the occasional gory remains of what was once a rabbit, well, you know. They claim it's more afraid of you than you are of it but they're full of crap! :eek:
     
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  5. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    I took a break from figuring out the Chrysler fuel issue and worked on the Willys pickup fuel issue.

    IMG_0923.jpg

    Took 1/2 of Monday and 1/2 of Tuesday but I finally got all the fuel line and the tank out the Willys Pickup.

    The fuel line was composed of:
    rubber hose,
    copper hose,
    rubber hose (threadlocker on the clamps)
    copper hose,
    rubber hose,
    fuel pump,
    rubber hose,
    copper hose,
    rubber hose,
    fuel filter,
    rubber hose
    and clamped onto a metal line headed toward the carb.

    Everything was either zip tied or held in place with bailing wire -- no kidding.
    Rusty beyond all recognition and ugh it stank of really old, bad, stale gas.

    I discovered that neither the parking brake (e-brake to the transmission - and no I don't know what that is) was not connected to anything
    and
    the ground wire to the fuel tank sending unit was not connected to anything.

    Today I removed the fuel sending unit from the tank and it was
    THE
    MOST
    DISGUSTING
    YUCKY
    thing I did after I cleaned up the dog poop in the kitchen floor 2 hours earlier.

    JW
     
  6. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    Letting fuel sit for a few years, will get that way – more so with the E-10 stuff.
    IF you know of a gasoline engine that will be sitting a period of time (lawn mowers at end of season, vehicles, etc.) the best thing to do is to either run it out of fuel or add fuel stabilizer to the tank (the first method is better).

    Letting fuel evaporate inside of the carburetor or fuel tank over the years, leaves some nasty deposits behind.

    A question for you. Does it look like the areas with rubber hoses, came that way?
    I know you will have hoses between frame and engine as well to/from filter.

    The reason I ask, is if lines are in questionable shape, a person might want to run new steel line for as much distance as you can, for each “hose connection” is a potential leak. Copper is not the best for low pressure fuel lines – as well as cost is way higher.
    BudW
     
  7. Oldiron440

    Oldiron440 Well-Known Member

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    Copper lines are not a good idea, copper gets brittle over time and is not crack resistant. Race organizations do not allow copper for fuel line for this reason.
     
  8. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    These lines look like making-do by the PO.
    It should be a rubber hose from the tank to a metal line that has all those fine looking curves you showed in pictures in another thread.

    I bought enough rubber to do the whole thing since I'm not confident of my metal bending skills and wanted to have that sweet taste of 'it works!' before I spent the $$ for the metal line.

    I'm wondering the point of the fuel pump in the middle of this mess.

    My service manual indicates there should already be a pump at the engine.

    JW
     
  9. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    Nothing like the odor of really old gasoline, is there?:confused:

    The electric pump was probably added to prevent vapor lock I would guess. There will be a pump on the engine, which will most likely be no good anymore. The electric pump keeps 3 or 4 lbs of fuel pressure to the inlet of the mechanical pump and pressurized fuel is less likely to vaporize and cause the vapor lock situation. We've added those to more than one old (40's to '70's) vehicles at work for that reason.

    Modern fuel is formulated for fuel injection which runs 40-80 psi (and the high side fuel system on direct injected gas engines, up to about 2,000 psi), so it tends to vaporize (a.k.a. boil) at a much lower temp than 20 or 30 years ago and carbureted vehicles can have problems in hot weather because of that. For that matter, it can cause problems with the old CFI/TBI low pressure injection too. Those only run in the 14 psi range.
     
  10. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    Should that pump be closer to the tank?
    Seemed strange it was literally under the feet of the driver
    JW
     
  11. Aspen500

    Aspen500 Well-Known Member

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    You are correct, the best place for an external in-line electric pump is as close to the tank as is physically possible.
    Should have a fuel filter BEFORE the pump along with the one after the mechanical pump on the engine also.
     
  12. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    So I need to reconfigure this setup.
    Tank
    Line
    Fuel Filter
    Line
    Fuel Pump
    Line

    Then up at the engine I need to find the mechanical pump and add a fuel filter before it.

    Got it...
    I'll go check out the engine.

    JW
     
  13. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    There is in fact what looks like a mechanical pump up on the upper right of the engine.

    Which means the fuel filter I removed would indeed been the one inline before the mechanical pump.

    And there is nothing wrong with having two fuel filters?

    JW
     
  14. Oldiron440

    Oldiron440 Well-Known Member

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    A filter before each pump will work just fine.
     
  15. Darth-Car

    Darth-Car Well-Known Member

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    I would rather have a second filter after the mechanical pump, but before the carb to insure that final fuel going to the carb is as clean as it can be.

    I don't see the need for a fuel filter before a dead mechanical pump.
     
  16. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    My My Darth-Car, you do get up and post early!

    I don't know that the mechanical pump is dead.
    Seems that adding the electric pump was an easy way to overcome the gravity feed from the tank if you happened to park on an incline with the engine higher than the tank.

    As I understand it, the mechanical pump at the front struggled mightily in that situation.

    But I haven't tested the mechanical pump yet.

    Figured you could come down and help me when (if) you get some vacation time saved up.
    :D

    JW
     
  17. Darth-Car

    Darth-Car Well-Known Member

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    You know I would come if I could! :)
     
  18. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    You and your lovely bride are welcome anytime.
    JW
     
  19. Justwondering

    Justwondering Well-Known Member

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    Who knew that brake lines should be loosened with flare nut wrenches?
    I though a crescent is what your used on line/tube connectors.

    JW
     
  20. BudW

    BudW Moderator Staff Member

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    Brake line nuts and fuel nuts (when applicable) – a person should ONLY use flare nut wrenches on.

    Weird looking wrenches – but they do work well for line nuts.

    You can use an open-end wrench after nut has been loosened or before its tightened. Otherwise, keep the open-end wrenches (and Crescent's) AWAY.
    Line-Flare Wrench.jpg
    BudW
     
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